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May 2021

Influenza disease and vaccination in children in Australia

Over the past decade, multiple initiatives have been implemented to strengthen influenza vaccination programs in Australia, with an increasing focus on children. In this article, we review these changes, the events that prompted them, and how they have influenced influenza vaccine uptake in Australia.

Published research Immunisation Influenza Infectious Diseases Epidemiology Subsite: Wesfarmers Centre of Vaccines and Infectious Diseases
June 2021

The Collaboration for Increasing Influenza Vaccination in Children (CIIVIC): a meeting report

The burden of seasonal influenza disease in Australian children is substantial, especially for those with medical comorbidities including chronic cardiac, respiratory, neurological and immunosuppressive conditions. Influenza is more likely to be severe in children with comorbidities compared to previously healthy children (e.g. more frequent and longer hospitalisation, more frequent intensive care unit admission and requiring respiratory support). Direct protection against influenza by vaccination is critical for children with comorbidities and remains the most effective tool for influenza prevention.

Published research Immunisation Influenza Infectious Diseases Epidemiology Subsite: Wesfarmers Centre of Vaccines and Infectious Diseases
March 2021

Barriers to influenza vaccination of children hospitalised for acute respiratory illness: A cross-sectional survey

To identify barriers to influenza vaccination of children hospitalised for acute respiratory illness in Australia. A total of 595 parents of children hospitalised with acute respiratory illness across five tertiary hospitals in 2019 participated in an online survey. Multivariate logistic regression identified factors most strongly associated with influenza vaccination barriers. 

Published research Immunisation Influenza Infectious Diseases Infectious Diseases Epidemiology Subsite: Wesfarmers Centre of Vaccines and Infectious Diseases
January 2021

Clinical experience with SUBA-itraconazole at a tertiary paediatric hospital

Itraconazole remains a first-line antifungal agent for certain fungal infections in children, including allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) and sporotrichosis, but poor attainment of therapeutic drug levels is frequently observed with available oral formulations. A formulation of 'SUper BioAvailability itraconazole' (SUBA-itraconazole; Lozanoc®) has been developed, with adult studies demonstrating rapid and reliable attainment of therapeutic levels, yet paediatric data are lacking.

Published research Skin Infections Infectious Diseases Infectious Diseases Epidemiology Subsite: Wesfarmers Centre of Vaccines and Infectious Diseases Skin Health
Dr Chris Blyth

Should you get the flu vaccine in 2020?

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Dr Hannah Moore: On-Time Vaccination Coverage