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Our researchers have helped unravel the causes of cerebral palsy, relying heavily on data from one of the longest-standing cerebral palsy registers in the world, the WA Cerebral Palsy Register.

This register was started in 1977 to monitor incidence of the condition, enable research into the causes and assist in the planning of services. It recorded cases of cerebral palsy for people born or living in WA from 1956 onwards. And it has now been incorporated into the Western Australian Register of Developmental Anomalies.

Analysis of our register data changed the thinking of what causes cerebral palsy and enabled research focus to shift away from the birth process and into earlier periods of pregnancy. The WA register also influenced national data on the cerebral palsies and good data are now available in almost all states and territories.

Importantly, our researchers used the register data to show that cerebral palsy is not only the result of birth trauma and lack of oxygen supply. They found that greater intervention at birth, such as performing more caesarean sections, was not reducing the birth prevalence of cerebral palsy, as had been anticipated by obstetricians.

Work continues to investigate many possible causal factors, including neuronal migration disorders, genetic syndromes, genetic propensities, teratogens (agents that can cause malformation of an embryo), multiple pregnancy, inflammation, thrombotic disorders, intra-uterine strokes, infections and head trauma after birth.

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Determine your risk

CP Respiratory Checklist

Developed in conjunction with Telethon Kids Institute, The Ability Centre and the University of WA (UWA), the CP Respiratory Checklist is a short interactive checklist that aims to determine risk for children and young people with cerebral palsy.

The questions are based on research conducted in Western Australia between 2011 and 2017.